Legal Software

10 Legal Bloggers, Tweeters, and Podcasters You Need to Know

Published by in Legal Software

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We’ve already covered lawyers who make exceptionally bad content on this blog. I’m looking at you, Winton & Hiestand Group.

Make Em Say Ugh? More like Make Em Say Nuh Uh.

Today I want to call out ten legal bloggers, tweeters, and podcasters who make exceptionally good content. From blogs to podcasts to Twitter accounts, these ten lawyers are worth your time and attention.

1. Brian Focht

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Brian’s blog is called the Cyber Advocate, and it focuses on helping lawyers and law firms use technology to make their practices more efficient and profitable while serving their clients effectively and ethically.

Check him out on Twitter and on his blog.

2. Mary Juetten

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Mary was one of my Five Legal Tech Entrepreneurs to Watch. She is Founder & CEO of Traklight, a self-assessment service for business risks, including IP. And she’s a Co-Founder of Evolve Law, an organization for change and technology adoption in the law.

“I thought I would be a white collar crime prosecutor,” Mary told me. “But decided I wanted to create software to help small businesses identify intellectual property after working with entrepreneurs who had made early stage mistakes that cost them dearly.”

Mary was named to the ABA’s Legal Resource Technology Center, 2016 Women in Legal Tech list and the FastCase Class of 2016. You can find her legal blogging at Attorney at Work. Follow her on Twitter. And listen to her on the Evolve Law Podcast.

3. Joe Patrice

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Joe Patrice is the Perez Hilton of the legal world.

The former litigator is now a full-time writer covering all the nasty stories the legal world creates for Above the Law. Recent hits include Murdered Lawyer Only The Latest Bizarre Twist In Bizarre Divorce Case and Supreme Court Curtly Kicks Lawyer In Teeth Over Extension Request.

Follow him on Twitter and check out the podcasts he hosts on Legal Talk Network.

4. Robert Ambrogi

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Robert Ambrogi founded the first Internet newsletter for lawyers in 1994. Since at least 2002, when he began Law Sites Blog, Bob has been the go-to guy on legal technology. Besides reading him on his blog, you can also find him on Above the Law and follow him on Twitter. You can listen to him on the award-winning podcast he co-hosts, Lawyer2Lawyer. It’s the longest-running legal podcast.

5. Aron Solomon

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Aron is the Innovation Lead for the LegalX cluster and Senior Advisor for education technology at MaRS. The MaRS LegalX cluster team connects technologists, designers, engineers, and lawyers with high-growth law firms as well as startups and established corporations in the legal industry.

Aron writes for the lawmade.com blog, which began when Techvibes asked for a series to explore “the topic of what the new world of law would look like.” Follow him on Twitter.

6. Daniel Gershburg

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Daniel Gershburg is a NYC Real Estate and Bankruptcy attorney. He’s Owner and President of Gershburg Law, and opened his firm as soon as he graduated law school. According to his bio, he did so “hoping to change the way small attorneys are perceived.”

Besides his not-for-profit and pro bono activities, including the Brooklyn Bar Association Volunteer Lawyers Project and PENCIL.org, Daniel teaches Bankruptcy and Real Estate law for various CLE providers, including LexisNexis, Lawline.com, and NACLE.com. Check him out on Twitter and listen to his I Am the Law podcast.

7. Scott Limmer and 8. Oscar Michelen

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You get two for the price of one! Scott Limmer and Oscar Michelen are co-hosts of the Reboot Your Law Practice podcast. It’s an awesome podcast devoted to helping lawyers adapt to the new legal landscape. And I’m not just saying this because they had me on as a guest last year.

Their episodes cover nearly every aspect of working in law as a solo or small-firm lawyer, from work/life balance to web presence and networking.

9. Richard Hugo-Hamman

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Richard Hugo-Hamman is Executive Chairman of LEAP, a consulting firm dedicated to helping lawyers in small firms leverage technology to do business better. Specifically, LEAP says that it exists to help lawyers:

  • Consistently deliver quality legal advice and services
  • Enjoy legal practice more with less stress
  • Generate sufficient working capital to grow the firm
  • Make a profitable business that will have value in the future

Follow Richard’s LinkedIn blog for tips on using tech to get paid along with using mobile accessibility to retain clients. Follow Richard on Twitter as well. You may also want to peep LEAP’s white papers on how small law firms can benefit from better technology (from making more money to avoiding mediocre cloud providers and everything in between).

10. Michelle McCarthy

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By day, Michelle McCarthy specializes in tax and business law as Associate Attorney with Gantenbein Law Firm in Denver, Colorado. By night, Michelle covers ridiculous lawsuits and other instances of lawyers and law schools behaving badly for Bitter Lawyer.

More?

For more fun law-related content, check out Fake News, Real Lawyer Jokes: 7 Times Comedians Taught Law Better Than Your L1 Profs.

Clearly, there are more than ten legal bloggers, tweeters, and podcasters who make exceptionally good content. What are some bloggers’, podcasters’, and tweeters’ accounts I missed? Let me know in the comments.


Looking for Law Practice Management software? Check out Capterra's list of the best Law Practice Management software solutions.

About the Author

Cathy Reisenwitz

Cathy Reisenwitz

Cathy Reisenwitz is a former Capterra analyst.

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