Project Management

7 Free Slack Alternatives

By | 14 min read | Published ; Updated on

Seven free slack alternatives that facilitate cross-functional collaboration between teams

Slack has been a popular project management and collaboration tool among project managers and their team members for years now. The software helps solve the challenges of driving team performance and achieving organizational alignment, especially during these times of remote work. It allows teams to communicate via instant messaging or voice/video calls, share files, and collaborate across departments and projects.

While there are a lot of things to like about Slack, including the list of integrations that it offers and the powerful search capabilities, there are quite a few other collaboration tools as well that offer a free version and can be a good fit for your organization.

We asked users about certain free Slack alternatives they considered when purchasing collaboration software for their organization. Here are the seven best alternatives they identified. Our list (presented alphabetically) can provide a starting point for your search.

/see the full list of slack alternatives.
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Top 7 free Slack alternatives
1

Asana

Asana is an online task management and collaboration software that enables users to manage and collaborate on tasks and projects. The tool also facilitates cross-team communication so that team members can share ideas and discuss work.

As an Asana user, you can directly comment on tasks, assign tasks to a specific team member, and leave feedback on images. Asana’s recent integration with Vimeo further allows users to record, transcribe, and embed videos within Asana projects. The software enables you to send messages to an individual or teams.

With Asana, you can share files, create customizable to-do lists, organize work documents, and monitor the progress of your projects. The platform integrates with Google Drive, Dropbox, and One Drive, which allows you to add attachments from your existing tools.

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Key Features:

  • Access controls/permissions
  • Action item tracking
  • Activity/news feed
  • Agenda management
  • Agile methodologies
  • Alerts/notifications
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Inbox overview in Asana (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/120550/Asana/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Inbox overview in Asana (Source)

Here’s how Asana compares with Slack

Both Asana and Slack offer collaborative features for teams; however, the two are fundamentally different applications. While Slack is primarily a collaboration tool with core features relating to chat and messaging, Asana is primarily about productivity management. In addition to facilitating communication, Asana offers task management features, such as task-list creation, project boards, and measuring progress.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Asana are cloud-based tools with browser and mobile support.

Typical customers: Both Slack and Asana can be used by freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Customer support: Both Slack and Asana can be used by freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Pricing: Both Slack and Asana offer a free version to users. The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas the price of Asana starts at $10.99 per user, per month (billed annually).

2

Basecamp

Basecamp is a project management and real-time collaboration tool that allows teams to collaborate, share files, create projects, and manage tasks. The software features a message board that enables you to keep the entire conversation about a specific topic in a single place. You can embed files or images into a message and share them with everyone or particular team members. The platform allows you to set up boards for different projects and teams.

Basecamp provides a task list system that allows users to tag specific team members and comment on task progress. Every project in Basecamp has a separate section for files. You can simply drag-and-drop spreadsheets, images, and other documents from your computer to provide people with access to important files. Documents created within Basecamp can also be opened in the mobile version.

The software provides you with a messaging platform and allows you to forward emails directly to Basecamp, discuss them with the team, and respond directly to the sender.

Basecamp also features a project calendar that allows people to see ongoing projects, events, and deadlines.

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Key Features:

  • Access controls/permissions
  • Activity dashboard
  • Activity tracking
  • Activity/news feed
  • Alerts/notifications
  • Brainstorming
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Viewing project progress in Basecamp (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/56808/Basecamp/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Viewing project progress in Basecamp (Source)

Here’s how Basecamp compares with Slack

Both Basecamp and Slack are online tools that help streamline communication and achieve project goals. However, if you compare the two, Slack is more of a communication-oriented platform, which gives you more options to communicate. In contrast, Basecamp is a task-focused project management tool that also offers collaboration features, including direct messaging, to-do lists, and message boards. Also, when it comes to reporting, Slack offers basic reports, unlike Basecamp, which offers detailed reports.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Basecamp are cloud-based tools with browser and mobile support.

Typical customers: Both Slack and Basecamp serve freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Customer support: Customer support: Both Slack and Basecamp offer email and chat support to users.

Pricing: Both Slack and Basecamp offer a free trial to users. The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas the price of Basecamp is $99 per month (flat), which includes unlimited users and projects.

3

Google Chat

Google Chat, formerly known as Google Hangouts, is a team communication tool that facilitates business communications within the Google Workspace ecosystem. The platform allows users to collaborate via text messaging, build chat rooms, have video chats, and share documents.

The communication platform allows you to choose the conversation threads you want to follow. You can also unfollow threads for which you no longer wish to receive notifications. Chat, by default, sends you a push notification for every response to your followed threads. You can even opt to mute these threads.

Google Chat also allows you to format your messages and add bots to specific chat rooms. The software uses predictive text to automate replies.

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Key Features:

  • Alerts/notifications
  • Mobile access
  • Search/filter
  • Third party integrations
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Chat rooms in Google Chat (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/175800/Chat"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Chat rooms in Google Chat (Source)

Here’s how Google Chat compares with Slack

Both Google Chat and Slack facilitate team chat by allowing users to send both private and group messages. When it comes to video calls, Slack offers unlimited 1:1 voice and video calls in its free plan and allows up to 15 participants in conference calls in its paid plans. Google Chat, on the other hand, offers the calling facility via Google Meet and includes up to 100 people in the basic plan.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Google Chat are cloud-based tools having a mobile application for Android and iOS devices.

Typical customers: While Slack serves freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises, Google Chat is best-suited for small, midsize, and large organizations.

Customer support: While Slack provides email and chat support to users, Google Chat provides only email support.

Pricing: The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually). Google Chat, on the other hand, is free if you are a Google Workspace customer.

4

Google Meet

Google Meet, also known as Google Hangouts Meet, is a video conferencing application developed by Google. The app provides high-definition audio and video conferencing facilities to users for up to 100 participants. It also allows them to join pre-scheduled meetings from calendar events and even record calls and share them with co-workers.

With Google Meet, you can turn on/turn off captions in a meeting. The feature works by translating the spoken language into other languages.

The platform allows users to join meetings via a shared link from any device. It also offers a dial-in phone number so that the participants can attend the meeting using their smartphones, even without a slow or no wifi connection.

As a Google Meet user, you can customize your view, pin multiple video feeds, make light adjustments to improve visibility during a meeting, use a video background, present screen, and mark meeting highlights.

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Key Features:

  • Alerts/notifications
  • Attendee management
  • Audio calls
  • Call recording
  • Collaboration tools
  • Discussions/forums
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Upcoming meeting schedule in Google Meet (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/176572/Google-Hangout"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Upcoming meeting schedule in Google Meet (Source)

Here’s how Google Meet compares with Slack

Both Google Meet and Slack provide video conferencing and file-sharing options to facilitate internal communications. However, when it comes to integrations, Google Meet has fewer of those than Slack, which allows you to integrate with over 2,000 apps, including Trello, Zoom Meetings, WordPress, Canva, and Adobe Creative Cloud.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Google Meet are cloud-based tools having a mobile app for both Android and iOS devices.

Typical customers: Both Slack and Google Meet can be used by freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Customer support: Both Slack and Google Meet provide online support via email and chat.

Pricing: The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas Google Meet is included as a part of Google Workspace.

5

Microsoft Teams

Microsoft Teams is an online chat-based communication platform that fosters communication and collaboration between remote-working teams. Some of the standard features of Microsoft Teams include one-to-one chat messaging, group chat, audio conferencing, and file sharing. The software also supports video calls for up to 250 users.

Microsoft Team also provides you with breakout rooms for small group discussions. Breakout rooms have the usual meeting features, including audio/video feeds and screen-sharing capabilities. The platform also features a whiteboard so that team members can add text, images, and diagrams on a digital canvas during a meeting.

The collaboration tool also offers live transcription, which is a written record of the words spoken in a meeting. Users can view the complete transcript at the end of a meeting, along with the respective speakers’ names. The application also allows you to monitor the technical status of your network and the quality of your calls.

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Key Features:

  • Access controls/permissions
  • Activity dashboard
  • Activity tracking
  • Agenda management
  • Alerts/notifications
  • Annotations
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Viewing the availability of contacts in Microsoft Teams (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/168668/Microsoft-Teams/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Viewing the availability of contacts in Microsoft Teams (Source)

Here’s how Microsoft Teams compares with Slack

Both Microsoft Teams and Slack aid communication and collaboration through a wide variety of features, such as video calling and activity tracking. However, Slack is primarily meant for chat-based collaboration with unique features such as message scheduling and reminder setting. On the other hand, Microsoft Teams is majorly an option for your video conferencing needs.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Microsoft Teams are cloud-based tools with browser and mobile support.

Typical customers: Microsoft Teams majorly caters to the requirements of small businesses and mid-large enterprises. Slack, on the other hand, can also be used by freelancers.

Customer support: Customer support: Both Slack and Microsoft Teams offer email and chat support to users.

Pricing: Both Slack and Microsoft Teams offer a free plan to users. The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas the cost of Microsoft Teams begins at $4 per user, per month (billed annually).

6

Trello

Trello is an online work management and team collaboration tool that enables users to organize projects and tasks into boards similar to sticky notes. The software features a kanban board that allows you to create and prioritize tasks, set project deadlines, and monitor progress. You can also assign tasks to team members, get status updates, and communicate on threads. Users can add comments and documents to the tasks assigned to them.

You can upload files to Trello directly from Dropbox or Google Drive and share them further with the team in all formats. As a Trello user, you can visualize key metrics, such as due dates and assigned tasks, using multiple formats, including calendar, map, and table views.

Trello comes with a built-in automation tool called Butler that helps automate repetitive tasks and workflows on boards.

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Key Features:

  • Access controls/permissions
  • Activity dashboard
  • Activity/news feed
  • Agile methodologies
  • Billing & invoicing
  • Brainstorming
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tracking ongoing projects in Trello (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/72069/Trello/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Tracking ongoing projects in Trello (Source)

Here’s how Trello compares with Slack

Both Trello and Slack solve different collaboration and communication challenges in an organization. Slack is majorly an instant messaging platform, whereas Trello allows users to visualize project plans and monitor project progress. Though Trello fosters collaboration, it is not as quite developed as a messaging app.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Trello are cloud-based tools with browser and mobile support.

Typical customers: Both Slack and Trello cater to the requirements of freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Customer support: Both Slack and Trello offer online support via email and chat.

Pricing: Both Slack and Trello offer a free account to users. The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas the price of Trello starts at $5 per user, per month (billed annually).

7

Zoom Meetings

Zoom Meetings is a video conferencing software that provides users with the facility for one-to-one online meetings, group video conferences, and real-time messaging. It supports up to 1,000 video participants and 49 videos on screen.

The software allows users to share their screens and record meetings for later reference. As a host for Zoom Meetings, you can restrict recording permission or even extend it to specific participants.

Zoom comes with a built-in scheduling feature that allows you to schedule meetings, send invitations, and manage scheduled meetings. You can also let other people schedule meetings on your behalf.

The application offers a waiting-room feature that allows you to admit participants, one at a time or all together, as they attempt to join the meeting. Some other notable features of the software include profile personalization and software personalization features, such as setting up a virtual background and touch-up-my-appearance functionality that allows you to automatically retouch your video display for a polished look during meetings.

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Key Features:

  • Access controls/permissions
  • Alerts/notifications
  • Annotations
  • Attendee management
  • Audience engagement
  • Auto framing
Trial/Free Version:
Free Trial
Free Version
Device Compatibility:

Screenshot:

<p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Contact directory in Zoom Meetings (</span><a href="https://www.capterra.com/p/144037/Zoom-Video-Conferencing/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Source</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">)</span></p>

Contact directory in Zoom Meetings (Source)

Here’s how Zoom Meetings compares with Slack

Both Zoom Meetings and Slack facilitate internal discussions. However, if you need a tool mainly for video conferencing, Zoom Meetings is a relatively good option as it supports up to 1,000 participants in a video call and also provides you with the option to record meetings. Slack, on the contrary, is better for text-based messaging.

Platforms supported: Both Slack and Zoom Meetings are cloud-based tools having a mobile app for iOS and Android devices.

Typical customers: Both Slack and Zoom Meetings cater to the requirements of freelancers, small businesses, and mid-large enterprises.

Customer support: While Slack offers user support via email and chat, Zoom Meetings also provides phone support to users.

Pricing: Pricing: Both Slack and Zoom Meetings offer a free version to users. The price of Slack starts at $6.67 per user, per month (billed annually), whereas the cost of Zoom Meetings starts at $14.99 per user, per month.

Assess all options when looking for the best Slack alternative

Despite being a popular tool for facilitating team conversations, Slack has its limitations, such as minimum file storage and overwhelming notifications. Therefore, it is always good to know about certain Slack alternatives that offer a free version.

If you need an affordable, easy-to-use product with unique messaging features for smaller teams, you can consider Google Chat. The application offers some advanced features, such as Smart Reply for an enhanced user experience. If you are already using multiple Google applications, you can also try Google Meet to drive communication via online meetings and share documents. Google Meet and Google Chat not only help you with your basic communication needs but are also free for Google workspace users.

In case you frequently need to connect via face-to-face meetings, you can consider Zoom Meetings as a Slack alternative. The platform supports video calling and web conferencing for quick video interactions and provides other major collaboration features, such as screen sharing and private meeting rooms.

If you are more focused on the task and project management side of things, Asana and Basecamp can be good Slack alternatives. Other than providing you with ways for communication, both these tools also allow you to assign, manage, and measure the progress of tasks. You can even consider Trello, for that matter. Besides communication, the software can also be used to organize tasks and work on larger files as compared to Slack.


How did we choose these products? We didn’t—you did

At Capterra, we objectively select and rank products based on a methodology developed by our research team. Some vendors pay us when they receive web traffic, but this has no influence on our methodology.

Products featured in this article were identified in user reviews as other products considered at the same time as Slack. In this article, we highlighted the products with the highest number of other products considered mentions.

To be included in this list, alternative products had to provide the following collaboration features: communication management, file sharing, and document management.

Disclaimer: We conducted this analysis based on reviews and ratings data as of Feb. 7, 2022. In order to present the most up-to-date information, the product cards below show real-time ratings. Please note that this means the ratings’ value in the product card may not reflect the value of the ratings at the time of analysis.

Product research for this article was contributed by Himanshi Arora.


Looking for Project Management software? Check out Capterra's list of the best Project Management software solutions.

About the Author

Shephalii Kapoor

Shephalii Kapoor

Writer @ Capterra with a focus on small business market trends, software requirements, and all things tech. Member of the Institute of Company Secretaries of India. Has a keen interest in music and reading books. When I am not working, you can find me talking to my friends with a mug of coffee in hand.

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Comments

Comment by Manasa Manogaran on

Helpful list. Here’s one more great slack alternative, that’s easy on the pocket: Zoho Cliq

Cliq is a great platform that helps you communicate, collaborate and manage your tasks, events, and workflows effectively. Collaborating with your team is easy through channels, audio, video calls, screen sharing, and group video streaming! Tight integration across all major Zoho apps is an added advantage and integrations with other productivity, project management tools are also available.

You can even build bots to bring in all your custom workflows right where your team communicates! I think it would be a great addition to this list.

Comment by Ashley Paige on

What abou Spike? As a freelancer that manages multiple clients and has to answer dozen of emails a day, I find it works best for me. It shows all your emails in a chat-like form so they’re all in one thread – no more clicking and opening different headers to find a specific correspondence, just simply scroll through like a iMessage or WhatsApp. It also has tools for collaboration like groups and video chat for mobile so you can get responses in real-time. Its definitely improved my productivity and made my work life much easier.

Comment by Sierra Henry on

Was surprised to see Glip wasn’t on this list considering I know multiple big corporations who use Glip.

Comment by Youssef on

Hi Rachel,

You didn’t mention about the frenchy talkspirt ?
talkspirit is a collaborative platform that mixes real time communication and asynchronous conversations in conjunction to answer all the needs of your organization.
Our servers are based in Europe for better data protection and we run businesses with more than 1000 users.
Feel free to test us, we offer a free trial at talkspirit.com

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Comment by Krutika Shah on

Nice blog. One more Slack alternative app is Wibrate. This app is really good and you can advertise with Wibrate(https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=dnk.wibrate.me) and drive more traffic more leads and revenue for your business. It brings you a Spam Free business communication. You can do team communication, team messaging, enterprise messaging, business messaging. You can share important business messages with this Free Text Messaging App.

Comment by Avishek Banerjee on

In addition to Slack, you may try tools like webex, R-HUB web conferencing servers, gotomeeting etc. for conducting online meetings, online conferences etc.

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Comment by Rachel Burger on

Hi Brent. I appreciate the thoughtfulness of your comment; no one likes to feel marginalized or stereotyped.

That said, I do have a background in theory analysis; in fact, my first boss was Neil Howe, of the Strauss–Howe generational theory; I did research for him on a wide range of topics relating to generational theory. If you’re unfamiliar, Howe is best known for coining the term “Millennials” in 1992. While you’re certainly right, not every single individual is predictable under generational theory, but birth cohorts feel the ripples of major events at similar points in their lives. For example, the Great Recession impacted people in predictable ways–if you were born after (Gen We), you’ll have a childhood surrounded by continuous job growth with abstract warnings about the economy, but no memories of the recession itself. If you were born closer to 1990, you’d be entering adulthood and just beginning to understand fiscal responsibility. If you were born closer to 1970 (Generation X), you likely felt the economic squeeze the hardest, especially because of the higher chance of losing your job while in the prime of your working years while their parents’ and grandparents’ health were declining and their children, also crushed by the economy, faced their own difficulties with joblessness. Born in 1950? Your impending retirement likely became compromised and many avenues to downsizing to reduce their costs–like selling their homes–would ripple into the rest of their lives. This isn’t an unfounded generalization. Each of those claims has been proven several times over.

[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8].

Happy to submit more citations if needed.

As a general rule of sociological study, the acceptable amount of diversity in a cohort is just the same as any other qualitative field established in quantitative data: statistical significance. While I recognize that not every single Boomer viewed car ownership as a rite to adulthood, a statistically significant amount of them did (a significant amount of research has proven this out; the links in this article are pretty comprehensive). The same is true for the assertion about Millennials that grew up at a time when consistent communication with their friends was possible. In growing up with this access to their community, it’d become painful to be cut out of it. The impact of that childhood reality continues to shape how Millennials prefer to communicate today.

Finally, your observation about the differences in tense for each respective generation dismisses all the text surrounding it.

For the Boomer generation, freedom meant car ownership. This notoriously independent group born between 1943 and 1960 shrugged off their overbearing parents and zipped around the country in Impalas, Mustangs, and Cortinas. Boomers coveted the open road, independence, and even disconnection.

That story isn’t true for Millennials.

It’s clear in the article that I’m not talking about Boomers today, nor am I talking about Millennials in 1975. I’m talking about how each cohort acted and act around the age of 20. Definitionally, there is no Boomer alive who is 20 years old. For Millennials, that assertion isn’t true; many of them are. Because I am referencing the present, so too does the verb follow.

The definition of “marginalization” is to “to relegate to an unimportant or powerless position within a society or group” (Merriam-Webster). By no means did this observation do so: there’s no assertion of which group is more powerful, nor is any claim unfounded.

I suppose the following could have been added to the article for clarity’s sake: It’s indisputable that Millennials will continue to be the largest generational cohort to make up the workforce for a long time. That’s a straightforward demographic fact. It’s also indisputable that Boomers are older than Millennials, therefore, in an absolute sense, there is no way to make the future of the workforce about Boomers and Boomers alone outside of science fiction. Nowhere in this article do I present any evidence that asserts anything that contradicts your statement that “women and men born before 1960, so-called ‘Boomers,’ [specifically 1943-60, if you want to get technical] as engaged, passionate and career-minded today as any other generation.”

Instead, it makes the assertion that a huge factor behind the rise of chat and ad-hoc project management software is due to Millennial preferences. That assertion has little to do with Boomers at all, outside of choosing not to mention them.

If you’d like to learn more about generational theory and analysis, I recommend Pew Social Trends, Howe’s monthly column in Forbes, and the Brookings Institution.

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Comment by Brent on

Hi, Rachel. I want to respectfully challenge the ageism in Capterra’s assertion that Baby Boomers equate freedom with “car ownership,” whereas for Millenials freedom means “access to the internet and online chat”. Not only does this dismiss an entire generation into an arbitrary category, but you also use the past tense when describing Boomers, whereas for Millenials you use the present tense. The implication is that Millenials are new, relevant, the future, whereas anyone born before 1960 belongs to the past. I assure you, women and men born before 1960, so-called “Boomers,” are as engaged, passionate and career-minded today as any other generation.

I certainly don’t think you intentionally marginalized a whole group of people with your article, but that is the unfortunate effect. I hope you will revise this post to clarify and correct the problem.

Comment by Neha Malik on

Hi , Good Information. …we need to add one more slack alternatives which I have been using, Troop Messenger which is a free business communication app for teams providing direct and group messaging with the ability to create public and private groups.

and you can read the article written by farhana based on troop messenger and slack
https://www.troopmessenger.com/blog/the-slack-alternatives-for-team-communication

Comment by Homie Gee on

How could you have not included Microsoft Teams? I use Slack, but really considered Teams as I’ve heard great things about it and it integrates into a lot of other tools.

Comment by Jackie on

Hi, this article is really useful for people looking for a software that can be used for work. Have you tried WorkDo (https://www.workdo.co)? It has more functions than chat and task as employees can apply leave and clock in directly from their mobile device.

It has chats, tasks, events, polls, notes, leave, attendance and expenses tools all in one app. It also has a web interface version.

The concept is to have a workplace and each team can create their own groups within the workplace. Each group also has the basic tools such as chats, tasks, events, polls, notes, albums and files.

Comment by James on

You can also try ideabnb.com in beta – same features as some of the others for immediate discussions but also helps take those conversions into larger discussions if need be. Sort of an end to end solution.

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Comment by Michelle Salomon on

A lot of people use Slack for community management purposes, although it’s made for team communication. In this case a lot of people like our tool Mobilize (https://www.mobilize.io) for community management because we do use email, and for external non-company members, that gets higher reach than logging into Slack.

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Comment by Developers Nation on

We have also used Slack for some time but eventually shifted to Ryver as it’s free.
We also use Bitrix, but only for CRM purpose and now it has unlimited users for free version also.

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Comment by Philippe Lehoux on

Hi Rachel,

I’m co-founder at Missive a team messaging app that merges email and chat. I wrote a post comparing Slack to Missive that can help you quickly grasp the potential:

https://missiveapp.com/slack-vs-missive

Missive was just named on Time magazine list of best 2017 apps:

http://time.com/4801316/best-apps-2017/

If you ever want to profile us, just send me an email. ?

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Comment by Joey Park on

Hi Rachel,

Just wanted to add a name on the list!

jandi.io

It’s called JANDI and currently, it is focusing on the East/Southeast Asian market

It really differentiates itself with the UI, because it is alot familiar to the popular group chatting applications such as KakaoTalk, WeChat, and Naver’s Line.

It has the integrations: Outgoing Webhook, Google Calendar, RSS feed subscription, Trello, JIRA, GitHub, BitBucket and Incoming Webhook

and it is a freeminium SaaS with 5GB provided to free users

Comment by Dana Potter on

I would recommend Brosix. It is an excellent alternative of Slack . I personally use it in my company and could say that it has improved office communication to the level I did not know it existed. It offers full set of features like File transfer, video call, co-browse and many,many more. Another very important thing about it is the high security it offers – 256-bit encryption.

Comment by Jane on

Hello Rachel – thanks for the post, I found it very useful. There are some great alternatives on the list. We’ve recently launched a productivity and collaboration platform called Crugo. http://www.crugo.com – We have also listed why we’re a great alternative to slack here: https://crugo.com/slack-alternative/ We would love to be able to get the chance to be listed and reviewed by you. I look forward to hearing from you.
Jane

Comment by Alicia on

A couple of months ago, I was put under difficult decision to find a better app than Slack or to stick to it and not like it. Eventually, I take the first road. I looked and tried some but I ended up with Brosix. I liked it because as an Admin I had all the correspondence saved, provided my colleagues with the chance to send files and chat securely, I offered them a new way to share ideas with Whiteboard and many more. We have paid for the whole year ahead and we not only found a better option for us, but also saved a lot of money in comparison to Slack.

Comment by Michaela Mallow on

I’m looking for a platform that enables staff both internal and external to my organization to participate. Do any of these have that capability? If not, do you know any that do?

Comment by Mario Paccili on

Great review,

I tried some of described but so far I ll stick with Gettick, there is more tools so far. Why you did not include this service to your comparation? I would be interested about your opinion.

thank you.

Mario

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