The Top 10 Chiropractic Statistics of 2016

Share This Article

0 0 0 0

Did you know the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects employment of chiropractors to grow 17% from 2014 to 2024? This is much faster than the average for all occupations. That’s two percent faster than we reported it was expected to grow in 2014.

chiropractic_stats

“People across all age groups are increasingly becoming interested in alternative or complementary healthcare. Chiropractic care is appealing to patients because chiropractors use nonsurgical methods of treatment and do not prescribe drugs.”

Here are 10 more surprising current chiropractic statistics as we move through 2016.

The scope of the problem

1. Sixty-five million Americans suffer from chronic lower back pain. (Source: New York Times)

2. Replacing doctor visits for back pain with visits to the chiropractor could save Medicare $83.5 million every year. (Source: The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine)

ACA_Infographic_Medicare_Costs

Back pain treatments

3. Study participants who received eight weekly two-hour group meditation trainings had an easier time doing things like getting up out of a chair, going up the stairs and putting on their socks, and were less irritable and less likely to stay at home or in bed because of pain after six months.  And they were still doing better a year later. (Source: New York Times)

4. 56% percent of patients who saw a doctor saw a 30% reduction in low back pain four weeks later. But 94% of patients who underwent manual-thrust manipulation saw a 30% reduction in low back pain four weeks later. (Source: The Spine Journal)

5. 61% percent of study participants who received meditation training experienced meaningful improvement in functioning six months after the program started. (Source: New York Times)

6. 58% percent of study participants who received  cognitive behavioral treatment experienced meaningful improvement in functioning six months after the program started. Only 44 percent improved with their usual care. (Source: New York Times

The job

7. The average Chiropractor earns $58,740 per year. (Source: Payscale.com)

8. Total annual industry revenue for chiropractic is $14 billion. It was $12.5 billion in 2014. (Source: ibisworld.com)

Software

9. Exactly 50% of the options in our Top Chiropractic Software Products directory are web-based.

10. The two most commonly found features among Capterra’s chiropractic software vendors are patient records and SOAP notes.

Conclusion

Any other cool chiropractic numbers you’re aware of?  Add them in the comments below!

Looking for Chiropractic software? Check out Capterra's list of the best Chiropractic software solutions.

Share This Article

About the Author

Avatar

Cathy Reisenwitz

Cathy Reisenwitz is a former Capterra analyst.

Comments

Avatar

Great valuable information! You have covered everything on “Chiropractic” that everyone should know about it. I’ve subscribed to your email list so whenever you publish a new article, I will keep aware of that. Keep sharing such good stuff!.

Avatar

I had no idea this type of non-invasive treatment could save medicare that much! Very interesting. Thanks for the stats.

Avatar

Wow that’s crazy “Replacing doctor visits for back pain with visits to the chiropractor could save Medicare $83.5 million every year.”

Avatar

Well now that I’m looking, I’m seeing $78,370. http://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes291011.htm Can you show me where you’re seeing $64,440?

Avatar

The Bureau of Labor Statistics have the average pay for Chiropractors in 2015 as $64,440 per year.

In my experience working with them, it’s usually MUCH higher!

Comment on this article:


Comment Guidelines:
All comments are moderated before publication and must meet our guidelines. Comments must be substantive, professional, and avoid self promotion. Moderators use discretion when approving comments.

For example, comments may not:
• Contain personal information like phone numbers or email addresses
• Be self-promotional or link to other websites
• Contain hateful or disparaging language
• Use fake names or spam content

Your privacy is important to us. Check out our Privacy Policy.